Sunday, 11 December 2016

TV Review: Fleabag

"I have a horrible feeling that I'm a greedy, perverted, selfish, apathetic, cynical, depraved, morally bankrupt woman who can't even call herself a feminist"

I left it a little while to watch Fleabag on television, for though Phoebe Waller-Bridge's ascension to the ranks of hugely buzzworthy writer has been pleasing to watch, I haven't - dare I say it - always been the hugest fan of her work. For me, the effectiveness of her writing hasn't always matched with the audacity of its frankness and so in plays like The One and TV shows like Crashing, I've admired the path she's taking without hugely enjoying it.

Her breakthrough piece Fleabag equally didn't hit my buttons in the way that it did for many others, thus my delay in getting round to watching it. And as is often the case with lowered expectations, it actually surprised me by being a very effective adaptation of the play. Its world has been expanded, both physically and personally, a whole cast of supporting characters now appear but crucially, there's the thing I was missing most at the Soho - direct eye contact.

Fleabag rides on its confessional style and on screen, Waller-Bridge and director Harry Bradbeer nail it, direct asides giving us piecemeal insight into the trials and tribulations of this young woman struggling to make life in London work. Afraid of being a bad feminist and unafraid of her sexuality, desperately damaged by the death of her best friend and unable to connect with her family in a meaningful way, the piece is thoroughly enlivened and enriched by its treatment on screen.

Helped by a crack supporting cast - Olivia Colman as bitchy stepmum, Bill Paterson as exasperated father, Hugh Skinner as hapless lover, Jenny Rainsford as the dearly departed friend - and a keen sense of balance to its comedy and pathos, this is definitely the way to see what all the fuss is about with Waller-Bridge.

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